Friday, December 19, 2014

A Lively Experiment, Week of December 19, 2014



NOTE: A Lively Experiment will not air on
Friday, December 26 nor on Friday, January 2. 

Tune in Sunday, January 4 at noon for our annual PREDICTIONS SHOW.
 Happy holidays to you and yours!

Panel
Dyana Koelsch – moderator
Maureen Moakley -  political science professor, URI 
Wendy Schiller - political science professor, Brown University
Dave Layman - corporate communications consultant
Jim Hummel - lead investigator, The Hummel Report

Topics
  • Governor-elect Raimondo’s appointees 
  • Change of personnel at the State House 
  • Judges’ decision re: former Secretary of State Ralph Mollis  
  • State’s economy 
  • RhodeMap RI 
  • United States relationship with Cuba
A Lively Experiment airs on WSBE Rhode Island PBS (36.1) Fridays at 8:30 p.m., with rebroadcasts on Saturdays at 7 P.M. on WSBE Learn (36.2), and Sundays at noon on WSBE Rhode Island PBS.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS transmits standard-definition (SD) and high-definition (HD) programming over the air on digital 36.1; on Rhode Island cable: Cox 08 / 1008HD, Verizon FiOS 08 / 508HD, and Full Channel 08; on Massachusetts cable: Comcast 819HD and Verizon FiOS 18 / 518HD; on satellite: DirecTV 36 / 3128HD, Dish Network 36 / 7776.

WSBE Learn transmits over the air on digital 36.2; in Rhode Island on Cox 808; Verizon FiOS 478; Full Channel 89; and in Massachusetts on Comcast 294 or 312.

Can't get to the TV? Watch the episode online anytime and anywhere on our YouTube channel. Episodes of A Lively Experiment are generally available to watch on the next business day. Subscribe to our YouTube channel, and YouTube will notify you when a new episode is uploaded.

On Facebook? So are we! "Like" A Lively Experiment on Facebook.

Discover East Coast Antiques in January on Rhode Island PBS





East Coast Antiques, a new antiques reality series based in the Ocean State, premieres on Rhode Island PBS on January 9 at 8:30 p.m. The series is part reality television and part destination show, with host and series creator Mike Rossi acting as the guide on a behind-the-scenes tour through the twists and turns of the antiques world.

As a licensed auctioneer, antiques store manager, and antiquities collector himself, Rossi brings a unique insider perspective to the new series. A television veteran with 25 years of broadcast experience, he is also the creator and director of the popular antiques television show Antiques Alley, which completed its run on Rhode Island PBS last fall.

The first season of East Coast Antiques will follow the cast as they travel up and down the east coast visiting antiques stores and auctions, flea markets and festivals, as well as home attics, in search of the people and items that continue to make antiques collecting one of the hottest pastimes today. Viewers this season will learn how to go about finding just the right item, the art of negotiating the best price, and, most importantly, knowing when to walk away.

The premise of East Coast Antiques is it’s an antiques show within an antiques show. The anchor or pivotal setting is a fictional store called Antiques Alley (the real-life Stillwater Antiques in Greenville, RI). Rossi is the manager of Antiques Alley and has three intrepid employees, who often have to fend for themselves because Rossi is busy on the road filming an antiques show for television.

Are we confused yet? Don’t be. Rest assured that any confusion evaporates as soon as the show’s main course is served: the great stories told by antiques insiders from their locations along the east coast. Rossi’s real life expertise and his membership in the world of antiques dealing earn him access to prominent personalities and experts who furnish thought-provoking and insightful interviews not available to the average TV producer.

The objects examined are seen through the dealer’s eyes, not the collector’s, so we quickly learn what’s hot, what’s not, and why. Employing a fun and conversational format, the show reveals the culture of the antiques world from the people who’ve spent their lives in it, analyzing trends and navigating the waters between the art and science of acquiring antiques.

In addition to Mike Rossi, the show stars toy specialist Travis Landry (Toy Hunter), antiques dealer Steve Mariorenzi, and Jolie Stewart. Each 30-minute episode will have three independent segments linked by four transitions that circle back to the Antiques Alley store.

East Coast Antiques will air on Rhode Island PBS on Fridays at 8:30 p.m., following British Antiques Roadshow at 8 p.m.


  

About Rhode Island PBS
WSBE Rhode Island PBS is operated by the Rhode Island PBS Foundation, a non‐profit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 1987 as a public charity to raise funds and provide support services for Rhode Island’s public television station. WSBE‐DT is a viewer‐supported member of the PBS network of public broadcasting stations, and transmits on three channels: Rhode Island PBS (digital 36.1), Learn (digital 36.2), and Spanish‐language programming on Vme (36.3). Committed to lifelong learning since 1967, WSBE Rhode Island PBS uses the power of noncommercial media to educate, engage, enrich, inspire, and entertain viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and education services at WSBE, visit www.ripbs.org.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS transmits standard‐definition (SD) and high‐definition (HD) programming over the air on digital 36.1; on RI cable: Cox 08 / 1008HD, Verizon FiOS 08 / 508HD, and Full Channel 08; on MA cable: Comcast 819HD and Verizon FiOS 18 / 518HD; on satellite: DirecTV 36, Dish Network 36.

WSBE Learn transmits over the air on digital 36.2; in Rhode Island on Cox 808; Verizon FiOS 478; Full Channel 89; and in Massachusetts on Comcast 294 or 312.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Act Now to Take Advantage of IRA Charitable Rollover for 2014

The Senate just passed HR 5771, the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014, which includes an extension through December 31, 2014 of the IRA Charitable Rollover. President Obama is expected to sign the bill in the coming days. 

Tia and Ken Scigulinsky have been long-time supporters of Rhode Island PBS and today we’d like take this opportunity to describe the vehicle by which they have made their charitable contributions to Rhode Island PBS, in hopes their story will benefit you as well.


Since being introduced in 2006, the charitable IRA rollover has become a favorite of charitably-minded taxpayers. Many have enthusiastically embraced the opportunity to transfer up to $100,000 each year to charity without being treated as a taxable distribution. It's a simple but powerful planning strategy for taxpayers 70 ½ or older who are required to take a minimum distribution from their IRA, but may not need the income to live.

Such is the case for Ken and Tia Scigulinsky of Portsmouth, RI.

Ken and Tia Scigulinsky
Devoted to their family, their community, and their country, Ken and Tia generously give of their time as well as their money. They volunteer with several education-related organizations and committees in the greater Newport area where they live.

Ken and Tia have supported Rhode Island PBS for more than a decade. Tia served consecutive terms as a member of the Rhode Island Public Telecommunications Authority, the station's former governing body, and currently serves as board secretary on the Rhode Island PBS Foundation Board of Directors.

The Scigulinskys recently sat with Rhode Island PBS Director of Development and External Affairs Molly Garrison to discuss why the charitable IRA rollover made sense for them.

"We've worked hard all our lives and now enjoy a comfortable financial position in retirement that permits us to support our favorite organizations," Tia said. "We appreciate Rhode Island PBS on several levels - the format that lets us enjoy our shows without commercial interruption; the abundance of music, cultural, and performing arts from the best stages in the world; the subtle but very real learning that permeates the entire schedule--"

"Turn on the channel and learn something new every time," Ken interjected.

"Plus, the station's commitment to producing and presenting local stories," Tia concluded. "All of those reasons define Rhode Island PBS's role in the community and why it's important to us."

"You can call it the lure of 'convenience, culture, and community,'" said Ken.  

"It sounds like a scripted commercial, but it's true," Tia laughed. "Rhode Island PBS really is the local trusted source of quality programming that actually makes a difference in the lives of viewers. I know it makes a difference in our lives, and we want to preserve that experience for future generations by giving what we can now," she said.

"As fond as we are of Rhode Island PBS, our motives are not exclusively philanthropic," Ken grinned broadly. "There's also a practical advantage to giving this way. We trusted our financial advisor's recommendation that it would be better to make our contribution directly from an IRA so that the money is not considered income to us, as opposed to receiving the IRA money as income, then making a tax-deductible donation." 

Plus, as Ken noted, donating these assets, rather than taking minimum required distributions, may also enable older donors to avoid certain penalties that come with a higher adjusted gross income, such as higher Medicare premiums.

"And it was easy to do, too," Tia explained. "A Web search summarized the process with clear, simple directions and included a sample letter to send to the IRA manager to request the transfer. A call to our financial advisor confirmed the move."

We at Rhode Island PBS appreciate the inspiring generosity of spirit and deed Tia and Ken demonstrate every day. We hope you find their story inspiring as well, and useful in your year-end financial planning.

These are the summarized requirements and restrictions for making a charitable IRA rollover gift:
  • The donor must be 70 1/2 or older.
  • The gift must be made directly from the IRA to an eligible charitable organization by December 31, 2014.
  • Gifts to all charities combined cannot exceed a total of $100,000 per taxpayer for the year.
  • The gifts must be outright, and no material benefits can be received in return for the gifts. 
  • The gift is not included in taxable income, and no charitable deduction is allowed.
  • The gift can only be made from an IRA. Gifts from a 401(k), 403(b), and 457 plans must be rolled into an IRA first, then the gift can be made from the IRA.
To complete an IRA charitable rollover, the first step is to contact your IRA provider to learn the provider's specific procedures. 

The charitable IRA Rollover expires December 31st. However, there are other creative ways to support Rhode Island PBS that never expire - where you and that station you love benefit at the same time. Such giving techniques are called "planned gifts" because, with thoughtful planning, you create win-win solutions for you and Rhode Island PBS. 

For example:
  • You can make a gift that costs nothing during your lifetime, by including Rhode Island PBS in your will.
  • You can give stock to Rhode Island PBS and avoid paying capital gains tax.
To learn more, call Molly Garrison, Director of Development and External Affairs 401-222-3636 ext. 336.

CLICK HERE for the sample letter

Tabor Boy: 100 Years at Sea


Tabor Boy: 100 Years at Sea is a documentary that profiles the captivating history of the Tabor Boy sail training program in which thousands of high school students have experienced the lifelong lessons of going to sea. Rhode Island PBS is pleased to present this documentary on Sunday, December 28 at 9 p.m.


Celebrating her 100th year at sea, Tabor Academy’s flagship 92’ sail training schooner, the SSV Tabor Boy, and the sail training program onboard, is the subject of a film by Emmy award-winning videographer and Tabor Academy alumnus John Rice of Above the Line Programming.

The documentary looks at the rich history of the current Tabor Boy ship from its origins 100 years ago as a North Sea pilot schooner to its use today as an educational platform for teaching nautical and marine science. Through a host of engaging interviews with former and current executive officers, captains and crew, plus amazing historical footage and stills, the film reveals the transformative power of going to sea, and the personal effect it has had on generations of Tabor Academy students since the sail program’s inception in 1917.

To learn about the Tabor Boy sail training program and its history, Rice did hours of research before joining the Tabor Boy captain and crew onboard last summer during the school’s new student orientation voyages around Buzzards Bay. Rice also sailed on a student research trip last winter to the Caribbean. Rice captured beautiful footage of local sailing waters and of sailing and diving in the clear waters of the Caribbean. Beyond scenic sailing footage, however, are powerful stories of accomplishment and leadership being taught through the Tabor Boy sail training program.

The documentary also follows the tall ship schooner on its open ocean journey in heavy seas, sailing from the New England south coast to Bermuda and eventually the United States Virgin Islands. In bays all across the USVI island of St. John, more than 700 Tabor students have conducted real-life marine science research, in conjunction with the U.S. Geological Survey, by diving, analyzing, and tracking the health of the Elkhorn coral species. The students’ research, conducted over 15 years, has led to the designation of Elkhorn coral as an endangered species.

Head of School John Quirk states, “Tabor Academy recognizes the value of our seaside location to enhance student learning in the broadest sense. The Tabor Boy program has played a major role in our school-by-the-sea heritage since 1917. It is a slice of American sailing history; a story about adventure and of real life lessons learned. The film shares our school’s mission in a clear and enduring way, and we are grateful for the opportunity to share it with the public.”

“We’re pleased to bring this local story to our community,” said WSBE Rhode Island PBS President David W. Piccerelli. “The Tabor Academy sail program is unique to the school but this film captures the spirit of the program in a way that is of interest to all.”

The film cleverly weaves the history of the schooner program at Tabor with the current program, masterfully sharing some unique old photographs and stories of Tabor’s past vessels and their captains, alongside recent footage of today’s schooner powerfully sailing offshore in heavy seas with her competent captain and student crew.

At its essence, Tabor Boy: 100 Years at Sea pays homage to a fine ship and to its many crew members who have had an experience of a lifetime.

After the December 28 premiere, Tabor Boy: 100 Years at Sea will encore on WSBE Rhode Island PBS (digital 36.1) on December 30 at 1:30 a.m., and on WSBE Learn (digital 36.2) on January 1 at 10 p.m., January 2 at 5 a.m., and January 3 at 2 a.m. and 4 p.m.

On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/taborboy
On Twitter: @SSVTaborBoy

About John Rice
John Rice is an alumnus of Tabor Academy and the principal of Above the Line Programming. Above the Line Programming Group is a full-service creative production company based in Hingham, MA. For more than 30 years, the company has produced over 350 hours of engaging programming for network, cable, digital, commercial, non-profit and business television outlets. President and Executive Producer John Rice has won and been nominated for multiple Emmy Awards for his work with Above the Line. For more info go to (www.abovethelineprogramming.com)

About Tabor Academy
Tabor Academy is an independent, co-ed, boarding and day school for grades 9-12 featuring a broad-based, challenging college preparatory curriculum including the arts and competitive athletics, as well as unique marine and nautical science programs. The SSV Tabor Boy is one element of the nautical science program and its sail-training program is the only one of its kind among independent schools. For more information about Tabor Academy or the SSV Tabor Boy, please visit www.taboracademy.org.

About Rhode Island PBS
WSBE Rhode Island PBS is operated by the Rhode Island PBS Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, established in 1987 as a public charity to raise funds and provide support services for Rhode Island’s public television station. WSBE-DT is a viewer-supported member of the PBS network of public broadcasting stations, and transmits on three channels: Rhode Island PBS (digital 36.1), Learn (digital 36.2), and Spanish-language programming on Vme (36.3). Committed to lifelong learning since 1967, WSBE Rhode Island PBS uses the power of noncommercial media to educate, engage, enrich, inspire, and entertain viewers of all ages in Rhode Island, southeastern Massachusetts, and eastern Connecticut. For more information about the programs and education services at WSBE, visit www.ripbs.org.

WSBE Rhode Island PBS transmits standard-definition (SD) and high-definition (HD) programming over the air on digital 36.1; on RI cable: Cox 08 / 1008HD, Verizon FiOS 08 / 508HD, and Full Channel 08; on MA cable: Comcast 819HD and Verizon FiOS 18 / 518HD; on satellite: DirecTV 36, Dish Network 36.

WSBE Learn transmits over the air on digital 36.2; in Rhode Island on Cox 808; Verizon FiOS 478; Full Channel 89; and in Massachusetts on Comcast 294 or 312.